School strapping in Canada

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

———————————-

Readers may want to write a review to promote the book for an esteemed author in our Happy Circle. Bunched as it is with other books it might wrongly be taken as a fetish book. A review might dispel that notion.

I am glad I proved helpful. American Way

This book has been printed in two editions, so please check before you buy! The black & white one is intended as an affordable option for those who simply wish to read the contents. The full-colour one is geared to anyone with particular interest in the examples exhibited.

The primary intent of this work is to provide a comprehensive look at how corporal punishment (CP) was formerly deployed within the Canadian school system: from a general history of school CP to the invention, adoption, implementation, policy and regulation of use, and the ultimate abolition of the Canadian regulation school strap.

Over one hundred former educators were interviewed to reconstruct actual trends in practice and procedure. Also included is a thorough look at manufacturers, suppliers, models, specifications and estimated market values for those interested in acquiring a real piece of educational history. This book discusses how our school CP practice was necessarily interwoven with world, judicial and parental CP influences. Included is a detailed study of one school punishment book to answer the questions of whether its application delivered any measurable result for any kind of behaviour, to what extent that result was observed, and if that result confirmed or contradicted popular opinion. Answers are provided to questions such as; is there empirical proof of CP’s effectiveness? Does CP save lives?

This book includes an account of all the typical opinions on the matter, why studies contradict each other and empirical world trends, popular myths and misconceptions about CP, the differences between judicious CP and abuse or violence, and the real reasons that it was abolished and it should never return. Much of this is directly applicable to another controversial subject: the current debates, ideologies and agendas on parental CP (spanking).

Some trends and facets of parental spanking are also presented, including: the Art of Discipline with respect to CP, the Canadian Supreme Court’s interpretations and why I believe it to be an excellent template, where the USA and UK differ, and why the Council on Europe agenda makes me address questions like. Do spanking bans collapse civilizations? This should be of interest to educators, CP historians, policy and lawmakers, and anyone with general interest in the changing trends of disciplinary methods and philosophies deployed at school and at home.

Chapters included are: 1 General History; 2 The Regulation School Strap; 3 Practice & Procedure; 4 The Punishment Book; 5 General CP Ban Trends; 6 The Abolition of the Strap; 7 A Penny for Your Thoughts; 8 School Strap Models; and 9 Suppliers & Prices The subject matter and images within are intended for a mature audience and may be disturbing to sensitive readers.

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May I say a genuine thank you to the Editor, and to American Way, for your kind welcomes. It is astonoshing: the wealth of knowledge that so many contributors have, and have shared within this forum. There are many people here who obviously know far more about this genre than I could possibly hope to. That’s why this is a really invaluable storehouse of knowledge. P.S. psuedonyms – there’s obviously no point in disguising myself so I might as well post under my given name 
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hcsj44

1,211

Dec 03, 2012#5

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

Hi Harold,

You have written about the leather tawse as well as the Canadian rubber strap. Can you give us any indication of the comparable severity?

I understand Canadian straps were a bit shorter than their Scottish equivalents, but I have been told that rubber was an inherently more severe material, though I’m not sure why.

I would be interested in your comments.

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HH2012

837

Dec 04, 2012#6

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

Hi hjc

That’s a great question, and like so many in this area, has both a yes and no answer! First, I should tell you that I have never been strapped in school. You may find it odd, but I actually regret having missed that as a life-experience, considering my unusual interest in the subject  So from persoanl experience, I cannot answer that. (I am, however, completely fimiliar with what leather or a slipper felt like across the bare bottom at home!).

There are a few who had been hand-strapped in our schools with both the regulation industrial-belting types and leather straps, and shared their thought onthis with me. They all agreed the industrial belting material hurt more, and this is likely a function of the material: The belting types had a series of rubber “bumps” (for lack of a better word) whereas the leather was obviously smooth. These bumps tended to grab the skin. That increased friction probably added to the punitive effect of the stroke, as the strap did not easily slide from the skin.

But, you have to remember, what was normally considered a leather strap here (perhaps an item 18″ by 2″ by 1/4″ thick) was nowhere near the ferocity of a well-made 24″ Scottish tawse. That was a much more severe implement, and I would have no doubt that it, wielded with full force, would be more painful than our staple item was. But here again, there is a great gradient of severity in leather tawse, from the flimsy McRosties of the 70’s and 80’s in Glasgow to the awesome 1950’s no-weight-stamp belts John J. Dick once produced in Lochgelly. I think any typical JJD 2-tailer would hurt more than our standard belting spec models (15″ x 1 1/2″ x ~4.5mm). Those are just my opinions, I wonder if there is anyone here who has actually experienced both and could comment?

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Dec 04, 2012#7

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

arrrgh, typos and dyslexia! …should be hjc

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Dec 04, 2012#8

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

hcj   so sorry, mind thinks one thing, eyes see another.

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KKxyz

3,57652

Dec 04, 2012#9

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

Fortunately, as most people have two hands, it should be relatively easy to compare pairs of straps in a single-blind experiment. Subjects would be blindfolded and invited to hold out both hands at once for simultaneous strokes from two masters randomly assigned to the straps. The subject would then say which hand hurt most and later, which hand was sorest. The experiemnt would be repeated a number of times.

I suspect it is the weight (density) and hardness (incompressibility) of the Canadian rubber strap relative to leather that is what matters rather than the fabric-textured surface. (I understand the regulation strap is made from fabric-reinforced rubber transmission belting.)

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HH2012

837

Dec 04, 2012#10

Hello everyone,

A few months ago, I discovered this forum via Google (while doing research for my latest work) and have read quite a few fascinating links. It’s great to see some familiar names from other places (Doctor D, Dean, etc.). I have been reluctant to post anything due to the public nature of this forum, but the Doctor has just cited a report (“Let your light shine… Nov 14 2012 6:01am)that I actually reviewed in my latest work to highlight a myriad of problems with such studies. So although I’m hoping CF will provide a review on his excellent site (I sent him a copy), I couldn’t resist now that the good Doctor mentioned that particular “study”!!!

For anyone interested, I have written a book “The Canadian Regulation School Strap” which details as exhaustively as possible, the entire genre of Canadian School CP, from adoption, implementation, practice and procedure, and ultimate abolitions, along with most of the popular arguaments on either side of the issue. It’s a controversial issue and that may explain why no one has ever written about it, prefering it to disappear into history as if it never happened!

I’m also surprised to discover that I independently covered a few issues that would be specifically raised here at various times (..such as if a paddle is an appropriate CP implement? No offense to the TWP’ers  ). What you may find of particular interest is that I have analysed an elementary school CP book in great detail and this has revealed quite a few observations that run counter to general opinion on the matter. I will state for the record that I am opposed to school CP, for reasons other than efficacy, but that does not discount the efficacy and recidivism results that were offered.

Typing that title into Amazon will readily find it as well as a detailed description of the contents.

Also, may I say a special thank you to “American Way”. You inadvertently lead me to a couple of items I needed (including a public domain image) for the finishing touches.

Hi KK,

That idea of a blind test would probably work! I hope you don’t mind if I don’t volunteer 

The belting material definitely appears more dense, which would add to the impact energy compared to a leather piece of the same dimensions. The first generation straps were made by impregnating a canvas/linen weave with gutta-percha rubber (thus they are all very dark brown/near black in colour). But what you said is true: once the advent of the automatic transmission came about, someone recognised that this material was likewise on-spec for producing school straps. Further, the material was much more durable than the first-generation models, especially as synthetic rubbers replaced the natural product. This is what would persist right up through the end.

There was a third generation type invented, using a different process which did not have the enclosing seam that the transmission belting models did. However, by the time this hit the store shelves, the strap was either already banned in most provicnes, or if not, then in their boards, or voluntarily put to rest. So although I have a couple of “new in the box” examples of this 3rd-gen, or last type, there is no evidence that this model actually made it’s way into use in the school environment.

—————————————–
You have written about the leather tawse as well as the Canadian rubber strap. Can you give us any indication of the comparable severity?

I understand Canadian straps were a bit shorter than their Scottish equivalents, but I have been told that rubber was an inherently more severe material, though I’m not sure why.

————————————-
That’s a great question, and like so many in this area, has both a yes and no answer! First, I should tell you that I have never been strapped in school. You may find it odd, but I actually regret having missed that as a life-experience, considering my unusual interest in the subject  So from persoanl experience, I cannot answer that. (I am, however, completely fimiliar with what leather or a slipper felt like across the bare bottom at home!).

There are a few who had been hand-strapped in our schools with both the regulation industrial-belting types and leather straps, and shared their thought onthis with me. They all agreed the industrial belting material hurt more, and this is likely a function of the material: The belting types had a series of rubber “bumps” (for lack of a better word) whereas the leather was obviously smooth. These bumps tended to grab the skin. That increased friction probably added to the punitive effect of the stroke, as the strap did not easily slide from the skin.

But, you have to remember, what was normally considered a leather strap here (perhaps an item 18″ by 2″ by 1/4″ thick) was nowhere near the ferocity of a well-made 24″ Scottish tawse. That was a much more severe implement, and I would have no doubt that it, wielded with full force, would be more painful than our staple item was. But here again, there is a great gradient of severity in leather tawse, from the flimsy McRosties of the 70’s and 80’s in Glasgow to the awesome 1950’s no-weight-stamp belts John J. Dick once produced in Lochgelly. I think any typical JJD 2-tailer would hurt more than our standard belting spec models (15″ x 1 1/2″ x ~4.5mm). Those are just my opinions, I wonder if there is anyone here who has actually experienced both and could comment?

=————————————–
Fortunately, as most people have two hands, it should be relatively easy to compare pairs of straps in a single-blind experiment. Subjects would be blindfolded and invited to hold out both hands at once for simultaneous strokes from two masters randomly assigned to the straps. The subject would then say which hand hurt most and later, which hand was sorest. The experiemnt would be repeated a number of times.

I suspect it is the weight (density) and hardness (incompressibility) of the Canadian rubber strap relative to leather that is what matters rather than the fabric-textured surface. (I understand the regulation strap is made from fabric-reinforced rubber transmission belting.)

————————————–
That idea of a blind test would probably work! I hope you don’t mind if I don’t volunteer 

The belting material definitely appears more dense, which would add to the impact energy compared to a leather piece of the same dimensions. The first generation straps were made by impregnating a canvas/linen weave with gutta-percha rubber (thus they are all very dark brown/near black in colour). But what you said is true: once the advent of the automatic transmission came about, someone recognised that this material was likewise on-spec for producing school straps. Further, the material was much more durable than the first-generation models, especially as synthetic rubbers replaced the natural product. This is what would persist right up through the end.

There was a third generation type invented, using a different process which did not have the enclosing seam that the transmission belting models did. However, by the time this hit the store shelves, the strap was either already banned in most provicnes, or if not, then in their boards, or voluntarily put to rest. So although I have a couple of “new in the box” examples of this 3rd-gen, or last type, there is no evidence that this model actually made it’s way into use in the school environment.