Letters


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AS one who twice last term received six of the best I can assure P. West [Letters, August 3] that when one is curtly ordered to bend over it is not the “humility and indignity” that causes one to utter a series of short sharp yelps.

Caning is painful, but who would expect punishment to be otherwise?

At my present age of 16 I would much prefer a caning, which is finished in under a minute, to an hour’s detention or 200 lines. I believe most boys would agree.

JOHN WHITE. Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire.

SCHOOL caning of boys of any age is a national disgrace, and does serious long-term mental injury. All other civilised European nations have abandoned the practice long since; so should we.

G. GRENVILLE HEARNE. London, W.1.

BOYS and girls of 18 should know better than to do anything to deserve caning if they have been brought up decently as children were years ago. Nowadays some are a disgrace to their families because their mothers neglect to teach them manners at an early age.

(Mrs.) C. M. DAVIES. Hadley, Shropshire.

HUMILIATING, say critics of caning. Surely the whole idea is to humiliate as well as hurt. Rules are meant to be obeyed, and if pupils know they may be caned either they should not break the rules or, if they do, accept the punishment.

(Miss) JEANETTE McCLAY. London, W.C.1.