Recorder and undisciplined youth

At the Central Criminal Court on Wednesday, before the Recorder (Sir Ernest Wild, K.C.), GEORGE ENGLAND, 17, porter, and THOMAS ELVINS, 18, fitter, pleaded “Guilty” to assaulting Montague Joseph Golding, a messenger boy.

England was sentenced to eight months’ imprisonment in the second division, with 15 strokes of the birch, and Elvins to nine months’ imprisonment in the second division, with 18 strokes of the birch.

Mr. Christmas Humphreys, prosecuting, said the two youths lay in wait for another young boy and then attacked and struck him on the head with a piece of lead. Both boys had good homes and employment, and without any apparent reason or excuse deliberately assaulted this inoffensive boy of 16.

In passing sentence, the RECORDER said that this type of offence, armed robbery, was becoming quite prevalent in this country. Some people attributed it to the sensational Press and the cinemas, but the real thing was lack of discipline, morals, or religion on the part of many young men of to-day. He directed that a reward of £3 should be paid to Golding.

 



Corpun file 21628

masthead

The Times, London, 21 November 1931, p.14

Woman robbed at Leatherhead

Birch for four young men


Click to enlarge

Sentence of 11 months’ imprisonment in the second division, with 18 strokes of the birch, was passed by the RECORDER (Sir Ernest Wild, K.C.) on HORACE STANLEY CHARLES CANT, 22, lorry driver, who, with three other young men, pleaded “Guilty” to charges of stealing a motor-car and committing a robbery at Leatherhead. The same birching, with eight months’ imprisonment in the second division, was ordered for FRANK WILLIAM ROY McMILLIN, 24, waiter, FRANK HERBERT RUDDLE, 22, cabinet maker, and JOHN KRAEUSSLACH, 24, motor driver.

It was stated that Cant had worked for the United Caterers, Limited, of Leatherhead, and knew that the manageress, Miss Plesants, was accustomed to put the firm’s takings into paper bags and carry them home with her to Sutton. On October 10 a car was stolen in Balham and at 9 o’clock the same night, when Miss Plesants was carrying home the money in an attaché case, she was struck on the back of the neck and the attaché case wrenched from her grasp.

After passing sentence as stated the RECORDER said to Miss Plesants: “I want you to get your nerves right. The law will protect you and all other women from ruffians like these. I will order that you receive £5 from the public funds to buy something to remember that fact that you are a brave woman.”